"Thank you so much for a wonderful tour of your village. What a wonderful project and we cherish the idea to protect the wildlife and the environment in this area." M. & M.       

The development  of the destinations is part of a community-conservation project funded by the UK's Darwin Initiative. It is a partnership between the Myanmar non-profit organisations 'Grow Back for Posterity' and Myanmar Bird and Nature Society and the UK's Harrison Institute. The project has also received valuable support from the University of Mandalay.

Hsithe Ecolodge and Environmental Learning Centre
The villagers of Hsithe, together with the Harrison Institute, have completed the construction of a new ecolodge. It is made of recycled wood sourced both from the village and from salvage yards in Mandalay. The cost of its construction is supported by a range of sponsors and the Harrison Institute. All income goes to the community.
The lodge will serve both as accommodation for visitors staying overnight in the village and as a learning centre in environmental awareness for children, both rural and urban; villagers; university students and tour guides. 
From the first floor verandah, which faces west, there are fabulous views across the river, including spectacular sunsets. It also looks onto the beautiful garden of the Visitor Centre.
Within the lodge, there is room for 16 adults to sleep in comfort, albeit simply, on new mattresses under mosquito nets. There are showers and toilets on the ground floor.
 
Together with the Visitor Centre, the lodge also provides an excellent education facility for Environmental Learning. We are currently expanding the programme of environmental education, which began three years ago, and which focuses on the Ayeyarwady River and its environs. In this, we are teaming up with national experts, such as school BEHS 26 in Mandalay and those from elsewhere in Myanmar and abroad.
Contact

 

Ma Hnin Witt Yee, Project Reservations Manager, Yangon on 09 250 640 728 or email hninhninmeister@gmail.com

Designed & published by Paul Bates, Harrison Institute. Revised February. 2019